Tuesday, March 10, 2009

The AP Prehab System:

Prehab: Sustainable Injury Prevention

At Athletes' Performance our primary goal is to increase the career productivity and longevity of the athletes we work with. To do this we must be certain that their movement patterns are symmetrical and efficient. One of the ways we do this is through a section of our training system that we call Prehab. This is the first thing an athlete will do on the training floor and is meant to prepare the body based on individual needs.

We will look at an athlete’s Functional Movement Screen score, and based on the movement demands of that day’s session, we will look to correct 1-2 top priority movement patterns (ex. Correct for the Active Straight Leg Raise and Deep Squat Pattern). Once top priority movements have been established we will correct imbalances using specific Self-Myofascial Release (SMR), Active Isolated Stretching (AIS), and Activation strategies. We will use SMR on specific areas that may be tight, weak, and/or overactive. We will follow SMR with specific AIS for the same affected areas. This will allow us to move the muscle through an active range of motion, increase localized blood flow, and begin grooving isolated movement patterns. AIS will be followed by specific activation or corrective exercises that are meant to innervate weak or under-active muscles/movement patterns. For example, we may perform Side-Lying Hip Abduction with Internal Hip Rotation and Extension to focus on Posterior Glute Medius activation without dominant Tensor Fasciae Latea activation.

This system allows us to handle mobility and/or stability problems all while developing clean movement patterns. It is important to note that this section of the program is focused and we only use the necessary exercises to achieve the desired results. In our training system Prehab is followed by Movement Prep where we go from isolation and innervations to integrated movement.

Athletes’ Performance Training System: 10min Prehab Example
Training Day: Linear Speed Development (Acceleration Focus)

Soft-Tissue (Example Method: Foam Roll)- 30s each
Tennis Ball Foot (Arch) Rolls:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/arch-rolls-tennis-ball.html
Foam Roll ITB:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/foam-roll-it-band.html
Foam Roll Quads:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/foam-roll-quadriceps-hip-flexor.html
Foam Roll Deep-6 Hip Rotators:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/self-massage-foam-roll-golf.html

Active Isolated Stretches (Method: Rope Stretch)- 1x5-10 2s holds ea
Calf Stretch:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/rope-stretch-calf.html
Bent Knee Hamstring Stretch:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/rope-stretch-bent-knee-hamstring.html
ITB Stretch:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/rope-stretch-it-band-glute.html
Adduction Stretch:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/rope-stretch-adductor.html
Quad/Hip Flexor Stretch:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/rope-stretch-quadriceps-hip-flexor.html

Activation Methods (Hip and Trunk Focus)- 1x10 ea
Diagonal Arm Lift:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/diagonal-arm-lift-feet-shoulder-width.html
Hip Abduction:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/hip-abduction-sidelying.html
Hip External Rotation:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/hip-external-rotation-sidelying.html
Hip Adduction:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/hip-adduction-sidelying.html
Glute Bridge-Marching:
http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/movements/glute-bridge-marching.html


Recommended Reading:
Anatomy Trains by: Thomas Myers
Active Isolated Stretching: The Mattes Method by: Aaron Mattes
Athletic Body in Balance by: Gray Cook
Core Performance Essentials by: Mark Verstegen

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